Brazilian Retail Sales up 0.5% MoM in April

Brazilian retail sales volume in April increased 0.5% MoM but fell 6.7% YoY, both worse than market expectations, according to IBGE (Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics). Although in the monthly comparison, most of the sectors have recorded an increase, it was not enough to reverse the downwards trajectory, still visible in the annual comparison of past months. 

Therefore, we continue with a negative bias to the sector’s performance in 2016, we do not know when sales will have the strength to reverse the negative trend, given:

  • The uncertain political scenario, which makes difficult the turnaround on the confidence and economic growth. 
  • Rising unemployment Rate
  • Low and expensive offer of credit

On the other hand, we have signs that the worst may be behind, since the decrease in retail sales in January was 10.3% YoY

Brazilian Steel Industry in Survival mode for the Foreseeable Future

The Brazilian steel industry has seem better days. If we look at the three stocks traded as ADRs in the NYSE, we can see the depth of their agony in the last ten years:

Gerdau (NYSE:GGB):

Gerdau - Brazilian Steel Industry Agony in the last 10 years
Gerdau – Brazilian Steel Industry Agony in the last 10 years

Companhia Siderúrgica Nacional – CSN (NYSE:SID):

SID - Brazilian Steel Industry Agony in the last 10 years
CSN – Brazilian Steel Industry Agony in the last 10 years

Usiminas (OTC:USNZY):

Usiminas - Brazilian Steel Industry Agony in the last 10 years
Usiminas – Brazilian Steel Industry Agony in the last 10 years

In the 27th Brazilian Steel Congress, held by the Brazil Steel Institute, industry executives said that the moment is still of high pressure and explained their survival strategies. As a common theme, they all mentioned exports will be the way to survive in the short term.

Benjamin Steinbruch, shareholder and president of Cia. Siderúrgica Nacional (CSN), said he believes the internal market is “the future” of the sector. It is necessary that the government create mechanisms to ensure that competitive conditions are the same as in other countries. He also complained about the high interest rate in the country today.

Questionable government policies in recent years have led to an impoverishment of the country. “It is the highest impoverishment through which a nation has been, without a war”, he said.

The new president of Usiminas, Sergio Leite, explained that the focus of the moment is survival – in the next three to five years this will be the order of the day. Meanwhile, calls for government priority to a program for the processing industry in the country. “Restructure and adapt businesses to market reality [is needed].” The “bottom” is already approaching, but recovery will take time, he said.

André Gerdau Johannpeter pointed out that the current crisis in the sector was announced. For some time, he said, we have been discussing the pressure that the Chinese excess capacity would have on the Brazilian market. According to the president of Gerdau, this oversupply from China will impact even on the next five to ten years.

“In the short term, what we can do is to seek export. There will be no domestic recovery”, Gerdau said. “Without exports, the picture is dramatic: layoffs and closed plants. In the medium and long term, we need structural competitiveness, changes in labor laws and taxes”, he added.

The event also brought experts on China and foreign trade, which said that the recognition of the Asian country as a market economy by the World Trade Organization (WTO) could distort the steel industry and other sectors in the world.

Usha Haley, professor at the University of West Virginia, said Chinese mills have access to cheap and easy capital, while receiving large subsidies from the local government. She believes that Chinas’s ultimate goal is just to increase production and, while maintaining employment and guaranteed volumes in the domestic market, be able to become a major exporter of the material.

Despite the gigantic fall in stock prices over the last 10 years, it’s hard to get positive on this industry. Sure, after so many years of oversupply and depressing costs, one could expect a turnaround and, in fact, all three ADRs are sharply higher in 2016. However, a more consistent recovery seems to be far for this industry.

CADE Approves Bradesco’s HSBC Brazil Acquisition with Restricticions

Brazilian anti-trust council (CADE) has approved the acquisition of HSBC Brazil by Bradesco with restrictions.

One immediate consequence of the of the restrictions imposed by CADE is that Bradesco is definitely out of the dispute to acquire Citi in brazil, since no new acquisition will be allowed to the bank for 30 months. On top of that, the bank has to lower the portability costs for HSBC customers that do not want to come under Bradesco.

With the acquisition, Bradesco gets closer to the largest private bank in Brazil (Itaú Unibanco). HSBC has around 2 to 3% of the banking system market share and now Bradesco should reach around 17%.

The EPS should have neutral impact for the first year, since the bank does not plan on issuing new stocks to finance the acquisition and the multiples of the acquisition are in line with Bradesco’s itself. The acquiring bank’s expectation is that the transaction starts to generate value a year after its closure.

What to Expect for Brazilian Interest Rate in 2016

Monetary Policy Committee (COPOM) has decided to keep the Brazilian interest rate benchmark in Brazil (SELIC) at 14.25% a year, unanimously. The central bank repeated the note issued with the previous decision, in which it says “we see advances in the inflation fighting but the still elevated cost of living and expectations are out of the target”.

Even with the repeated note, economists started to review their opinions about when the interest rate will go down again. The last meeting was still ran by central bank president Alexandre Tombini. Now, Ilan Goldfajn will be the one responsible  to deal with variables like economic recession and inflation. Inflation, by the way, that was showing signs of reduction but has again showed resilience.

According to newspaper Folha de São Paulo, despite inflation have shown acceleration in May, the interim government of Michel Temer believes that the fall in the US Dollar exchange rate and the credibility of the new economic team opens space for a reduction in the SELIC. The government is working under the assumption of inflation declaration by year end as well as a further drop in the US$. According to the report, Folha’s initial forecast was for a drop in the interest rate in July but now this may be postponed till August.

And that review in expectation was also followed by other investment banks, such as Goldman Sachs and Bradesco. Bradesco now believes the interest rate benchmark will end the year at 12.75% versus 12.25% before.

Brazil mulls emergency loan to Rio de Janeiro ahead of Olympics

By Alonso Soto and Marcela Ayres

BRASILIA (Reuters) – Brazil is considering an emergency loan to the cash-strapped state of Rio de Janeiro as it prepares to host the Olympic Games in less than two months, according to two senior government officials familiar with the situation.

The loan would be guaranteed by the state’s participation in local companies and could be extended to the states of Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul, which are struggling to pay employees and pensioners as a crippling recession reduces tax revenues.

“These states need cash injection. There is no other way,” said a member of the government’s economic team who asked for anonymity in order to speak freely. “These loans will be backed by states’ assets such as banks, utilities, gas and sanitation companies.”

Eligible states would transfer their stakes in government-led companies to the federal government, which could in turn sell them to private investors as it did during the last states’ debt restructuring in the late 1990s, the source said.

Rio’s main state-controlled company is its water and sewer provider Companhia Estadual de Aguas e Esgotos do Rio de Janeiro, commonly known as Cedae.

The city of Rio de Janeiro has enough money to complete the infrastructure for the Olympics, but a financial crisis at the state level threatens to disrupt public services during one of the world’s biggest sporting events, which starts on Aug. 5.

The oil-producing state, hit hard by the recession and drop in crude prices, faced its worst ever public health crisis this year when unpaid doctors and nurses walked off the job at hospitals and clinics were left without essential supplies such as syringes and disinfectants.

The Rio Olympics, the first held in South America, also has been marred by political turmoil that led to the suspension of the president and an outbreak of the mosquito-borne Zika virus that has been linked to brain malformation in babies in Brazil.

The amount of the emergency loans will depend on how much debt relief the government can give other states also in fiscal distress, another source involved in the talks said.

On Thursday, several Brazilian states seeking relief from debt that amounts to 11.2 percent of Brazil’s gross domestic product resumed talks with the government of interim President Michel Temer.

This creates a tricky situation for Temer, who in May replaced suspended President Dilma Rousseff while she stands trial for allegedly breaking fiscal rules. Providing relief to the states could exacerbate a fiscal crisis that has cost the country its hard-won investment grade rating late last year, driving up borrowing costs.

Temer’s government has rejected a proposal to pardon state debt payments for two years and lower interest rates retroactively, according to state representatives who met with finance ministry officials on Thursday. More meetings are scheduled for next week.

The finance ministry press office declined to comment. The finance secretary of Rio de Janeiro could be not be reached for comment.

Rio de Janeiro’s finances have deteriorated so much that the state missed debt payments to a French development bank and the Inter-American Development Bank last month. Moody’s Investor Services called the event a “credit negative for all of Brazil’s states.”

The state ramped up its payroll during years of high oil prices, expecting that royalties on massive crude discoveries off its coast would keep its coffers full.

Now the state is cutting social programs, eliminating secretariats and raising taxes to plug an expected budget deficit of 19.9 billion reais ($5.91 billion) this year.

Rio Grande do Sul-state Finance Secretary Giovani Feltes confirmed the negotiations for the loans, which he said will be used only for investment, but will give his state a much-needed breather.

“This loan will not go to current expenditures because the law doesn’t allow us to use loans to pay our employees,” Feltes said in a phone interview. “Obviously this (loan) would improve out fiscal situation.”